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Gertrude Bell Collection

 
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BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Dec 2009 15:14    Onderwerp: Gertrude Bell Collection Reageer met quote

Proef de sfeer in en uit het Midden-Oosten...
Het is meer achtergrondinformatie dan daadwerkelijke oorlogsinformatie!

http://www.gerty.ncl.ac.uk/index.php

Van de site:

Having most relevance for research in Archaeology, History, Politics and Travel, the books and papers of Gertrude Bell (1868-1926) were given to Newcastle University Library by Gertrude's half-sister, Lady Richmond.

The Papers
The Gertrude Bell Papers comprise Gertrude's personal correspondence, diaries and miscellaneous items, such as Review of the Civil Administration of Mesopotamia (1920), notebooks, obituaries, lecture notes and miscellaneous reports, memoranda and cuttings. Circa. 1,600 letters and diaries covering the years 1877-1879 and 1893-1900 (with some gaps reflecting where we do not have the hard-copy diary) can be found transcribed on this website, along with c.7,000 of her archaeological and travel photographs. (The photographic portion of the Gertrude Bell archive is administered by the School of Historical Studies.) Neither letters to and from army officer Charles Doughty-Wylie (written 1913-1915) nor any of the Miscellaneous materials have been transcribed although a handlist to the Miscellaneous part of the collection is available

Gertrude Bell (1868-1926)
Gertrude Margaret Lowthian Bell was born into a wealthy family at Washington New Hall in what was then County Durham. Initially home-schooled, she then attended school in London and graduated with a first-class degree in Modern History from Oxford University. Thereafter she travelled in Europe and also spent several months in Bucharest and in Tehran. Her travels continued with two round-the-world trips: one in 1897-1898 and one in 1902-1903.

From the turn of the century, Gertrude developed a love of the Arab peoples - she learned their languages, investigated their archaeological sites and travelled deep into the desert. This intimate knowledge of the country and its tribes made her a target of British Intelligence recruitment during the First World War. At the end of the war, Gertrude focussed on the future of Mesopotamia and was to become a powerful force in Iraqi politics, becoming a kingmaker when her preferred choice, Faisal (son of Husain, the Sharif of Mecca and King of the Hijaz) was crowned King of the state of Iraq in August 1921.

Gertrude's first love remained archaeology and, as Honorary Director of Antiquities in Iraq, she established the Iraq Museum in Baghdad. Her 1905 expedition through the Syrian Desert to Asia Minor was published as The Desert and the Sown and her study, in 1907, of Binbirkilise on the Kara Dag mountain was published as The Thousand and One Churches and remains the standard work on early Byzantine architecture in Anatolia.



Moderators: heb geen idee of dit op de juiste plaats in de index staat...
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Nov 2011 13:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Angelina Jolie speelt archeologe Gertrude Bell

AMSTERDAM - Angelina Jolie kruipt in de huid van de Engelse archeologe en schrijfster Gertrude Bell in een film over haar leven.

Quote:

Het project is een initiatief van Ridley Scott, die de film ook wil regisseren, schrijft het Amerikaanse entertainmenttijdschrift The Hollywood Reporter.
Bell werd beroemd met haar politieke betrokkenheid bij het Midden-Oosten. Ze schreef boeken over haar politieke werk in de regio, over onbekende culturen en haar rol als vrouw in een mannenwereld. Tijdens de Eerste Wereldoorlog werkte Bell voor de Britse geheime dienst.

Bell overleed in 1926 op 57-jarige leeftijd aan een overdosis slaappillen. Ze zou geen zelfmoord hebben gepleegd, omdat ze aan haar huishoudster had gevraagd haar te wekken.
Regiedebuut
Scenarist Jeffrey Caine, bekend van The Constant Gardener en Bondfilm GoldenEye, schrijft het script van de film. De 36-jarige Jolie heeft pas haar regiedebuut In the Land of Blood en Honey afgerond over de oorlog in Bosnië. De actrice werd wereldberoemd door haar titelrol als avonturier in Lara Croft: Tomb Raider uit 2001.
Wanneer Scott met Gertrude Bell wil beginnen, is nog onbekend. Hij werkt momenteel aan de afronding van Prometheus, een prequel op zijn sciencefictionfilm Alien. Daarnaast heeft hij zich verbonden aan een biografische film met Gerard Butler als Simon Mann, die in 2004 een mislukte coup pleegde tegen de president van het Afrikaanse land Equatoriaal-Guinea.


http://www.nu.nl/film/2671422/angelina-jolie-speelt-archeologe-gertrude-bell.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Aug 2012 13:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Quote:
Naomi Watts en Robert Pattinson in Queen of the Desert
AMSTERDAM - Naomi Watts zal de titelrol gaan spelen in de film Queen of the Desert. Robert Pattinson neemt de rol van Lawrence of Arabia op zich.

Foto: ANP
Dat meldt The Hollywood Reporter.
De film zal het verhaal vertellen van Gertrude Bell, een onderzoekster, schrijfster en archeologe die een grote rol speelde in de revolutie in het Midden-Oosten tijdens de eerste wereldoorlog. Watts zal Bell spelen.
Pattinson neemt de rol van T.E. Lawrence op zich, een archeoloog die een Britse legerofficier wordt en net als Bell een grote invloed heeft gehad in het Midden-Oosten. Lawrence en Bell werden goede vrienden.
De opnames van de film staan voor deze herfst gepland. De film wordt geregisseerd door Werner Herzog, bekend van de documentaire Grizzly Man.


http://www.nu.nl/film/2884899/naomi-watts-en-robert-pattinson-in-queen-of-the-desert.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Aug 2012 13:09    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Gertrude of Arabia
The British occupation of Iraq may have seemed like ancient history to the Americans who arrived in Baghdad in 2003. The Iraqis soon showed them otherwise. There were British cemeteries, British-built schools, hospitals, railroads and clubs; I once stumbled on a battered old billiard table donated in the 1920s by King George V. Above all, there was the painfully familiar record of the British struggle to build a nation. And at its center was a stiff-backed officer whom even today the Iraqis call, as if she had been a revered schoolmistress, “Miss Bell.”

Gertrude Bell was precisely the kind of colonial administrator the Americans desperately needed in 2003. Fluent in Arabic and Persian, she had spent almost a decade before World War I crisscrossing the desert, making maps and gaining the trust of tribal leaders and kings. She knew the Mesopotamian region and its people so intimately that one prominent Iraqi sheik, asked about the geographical boundaries of his tribe, told his questioner to ask Bell.

The British government hired her soon after the First World War started, recognizing that she could help turn the Arabs against Ottoman Turkey, Germany’s ally. She did far more than that. After working in Cairo with T. E. Lawrence, whose vainglorious legend she never shared, Bell virtually created modern Iraq. She drafted its borders, corralled its reluctant tribal chiefs and trained Faisal (who had never been there) to be its first king. She came to be known as Umm al Mu’mineen, or Mother of the Faithful.

Georgina Howell, a British journalist, has produced a breathless, somewhat worshipful biography of Bell. It contains almost no mention of Iraq’s recent troubles, and relegates Bell’s work in Iraq to the last third of the book — a surprising decision, given the country’s prominence in her life (and in today’s headlines). This may be because other writers have focused heavily on Bell’s Baghdad years, most notably Janet Wallach in her excellent 1996 biography, “Desert Queen.”

In fairness, Howell’s book makes clear that Bell’s whole life was extraordinary. Born into England’s sixth-richest family, she was furiously independent almost from the start. She declared her atheism as a girl, and later, her intolerance for pretension. (“I have had enough of these dinners where people say ‘I think’ all the time,” she wrote home from London. She wanted to know.) She became the first woman to get a first-class degree in modern history at Oxford, the first woman ever to travel alone in the Syrian desert, the first female officer in British military intelligence.

She also campaigned actively against female suffrage. Despite her own achievements, she accepted the prevailing Victorian view that women were not qualified to make decisions about affairs of state. And as a daughter of the establishment, she was offended by the militancy of the suffragist movement.

Howell suggests that Bell later came to regret this. She also provides fascinating examples of Bell’s struggles with her prescribed role as a woman. She was beautiful, with red hair, fine features and piercing green eyes, and she had at least two passionate love affairs (though she never married and seems to have died a virgin). But she insisted on taking roles that had been reserved for men, fighting constantly against the sexism of British officials. (“She is a remarkably clever woman with the brains of a man,” one peer wrote; others were less kind.) She also had an ill-concealed disgust for most other women, whom she saw as vain and shallow. They generally returned her condescension with scorn.

Howell has unearthed some wonderful material, and she wisely interweaves her text with plenty of quotations from Bell’s own trenchant prose. Some of the most clearsighted things ever written about Iraq (at least in English) came from the pen of Gertrude Bell.

But elsewhere Howell is something of a slave to Bell’s voluminous diaries. She needlessly documents her heroine’s Alpine mountaineering expeditions right down to what she ate for lunch on the Barre des Écrins (“bread and jam, with sardines”).

When it comes to Iraq, Howell accepts Bell’s own views too readily, both about herself and about the broader British imperial mission. At one point Howell refers in passing to “the peculiarly British notion of public service free of corruption” as if it were an unmixed gift to subject peoples.

Howell does not ask, for instance, whether Bell’s peremptory dismissal of religious leaders was wise (“How I do hate Islam!” she wrote in 1921). She favored the more secular Sunni Arabs and helped reinforce their domination over the more numerous Shiites. She argued strenuously against an independent Kurdistan. All these things could be said to have helped forge an inherently unstable polity, leading to bloodshed and war and Iraq’s present disintegration.

Still, Bell’s achievement as a nation builder was extraordinary, especially compared with the American example of the past few years. When she killed herself with sleeping pills in Baghdad in 1926, days before the inauguration of Faisal’s government, it was not because she had failed. Her work was done, the king no longer needed her and she had fallen into a deep depression. The monarchy she helped build lasted until 1958, longer than some of its creators ever expected.

Robert F. Worth, a Times correspondent, has reported on Iraq for the paper since 2003.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/29/books/review/Worth.t.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Jul 2014 14:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

For British Spy in Iraq, Affection Is Strong but Legacy Is Unfulfilled


Gertrude Bell, who worked to stabilize Iraq after World War I, won hearts and minds but was unable to meld a mix of religious sects into a stable nation

BAGHDAD — A picture of Gertrude Bell, the British diplomat and spy, still hangs on a wall in the Alwiya Club, the Baghdad clubhouse for the social elite that she established, and black-and-white photographs of her can be found in the collections of the city’s old families.

More than anyone else, she is credited with creating modern Iraq — drawing its borders, choosing its king — after the upheavals of World War I. She also died here, and her raised tomb surrounded by jasmine bushes in a British cemetery has been tended for decades by a man named Ali Mansour.

“We love her around here,” Mr. Mansour said. “She brought Iraqis together.”

Today, though, her legacy, which has always been fragile, is at risk of being undone amid the renewed sectarian violence that has already seen Sunni militants effectively erase the border she drew between Iraq and Syria and raised the possibility of Iraq fracturing into Sunni, Shiite and Kurdish territories. Seen through the experience of Iraq’s tumultuous recent past, the decisions made by Miss Bell, as she is still affectionately referred to by Iraqis, and others working for the British and French to reorder the Middle East after the Ottoman Empire collapsed nearly a century ago, hold cautionary lessons for those seeking to bring stability or seek advantage in the region now.




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