Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

Testament of Youth

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Boeken en recensies Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45652

BerichtGeplaatst: 02 Aug 2009 8:59    Onderwerp: Testament of Youth Reageer met quote

Testament of Youth

This book, first published in 1933, now reissued in a handsome hardback edition, is part of the canon of WWI literature, alongside Robert Graves’ Goodbye to All That or Erich Maria Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front. It tells the true story of a determined, clever girl, born into middle-class provincial society in 1893, who won a place at Somerville College, Oxford (then an achievement in itself) and who brilliantly captures the protracted horrors of a war into which her generation was precipitated unprepared.

Vera Brittain spent those years as a Voluntary Aid Detachment nurse in London, France and Malta. Being a woman she survived; all the young officers of her close circle – her beloved brother and his three friends from Uppingham School, which lost one in five of every old boy who served – were killed. Although she had aspired to be a novelist, it is for this book that she is rightly remembered.

The reason is not hard to discover; she was a born writer of a certain kind: diarist, letter-writer and perceptive social commentator, describing with honesty and poignant power the feelings and emotions of a whole generation. By 1933, after several fictional attempts to put into words what she had experienced, Britain had discovered ‘the emotion recollected in tranquillity’ necessary to pen this memorable witness.

Divided into three parts, it charts her life before the war, living through 1914-1918, and the difficulties of adjusting to post-war existence. It combines a fascinating chronicle of leisured Edwardian England, its bloody demise and the problem of rediscovering a purpose in life when pre-war assumptions, aspirations and values had been irretrievably wrecked.

Life before the war comprised endless games of bridge, tennis and golf, interspersed with social calls and country walks around Buxton where she grew up. Girls were expected to marry, not study or have careers. Vera rebelled against such a destiny – “a mentally vivacious young woman cannot live entirely upon scenery” - and by perseverance, strong will and intelligence, went to Oxford to study English Literature. Then the war intervened.

The middle section, dealing with the deaths, first of her fiancé, Roland Leighton, Uppingham prize scholar, then his friends, Victor Richardson and Geoffrey Thurlow, and finally that of her brother Edward, killed on 15th June 1918 in northern Italy, is written with a controlled anguish that still grips the heart of a modern reader, despite familiarity with the story. In 1916, Vera comments with dread, “I was only at the beginning of my 20s; I might have another 40, perhaps 50 years to live”. Her brother’s death, only a few months before the end of the war, was heralded by “the sudden loud clattering at the front-door knocker that always meant a telegram”.

In fact Vera did not die until 1970. She finally found happiness with her marriage to the university lecturer and philosopher George Catlin, and spent her remaining 50 years in unstinting, duty-driven pursuits: lecturing on pacifism (a lifelong conviction) and feminism and writing articles on aspects of social work as they concerned women and children. Her daughter, the Liberal Democrat life peer, Baroness Shirley Williams, in her preface to the 1977 edition, comments that after the war “it was hard for [her mother] to laugh”. Brittain herself writes here that the war “had condemned me to live to the end of my days in a world without confidence or security.”

A compulsive diarist – “I poured into it the chaotic wretchedness which, had...no other outlet” - her book relies heavily on extracts from it and from the letters she wrote and received from family and from the Front. This gives it an immediacy and accuracy that recollection alone would not have provided. Religious belief could give no consolation; Vera rejected conventional Christianity during the war and hope in the resurrection of her loved ones was replaced by an ardent resolve to change the world by political means: “There was only a brief interval between darkness and darkness in which to fulfil obligations both to individuals and society, which could not be postponed to the comfortable futurity of a compensating heaven.”

One might, from a contemporary perspective, challenge her firmly held convictions on feminism and children’s upbringing, or her support for Marie Stopes’s “Society for Constructive Birth Control”. Yet as a personal and social document of its turbulent times, written from the viewpoint of a serious and reflective young woman, this autobiographical work fully merits rediscovery.

Francis Phillips writes from Buckinghamshire in the UK.

© http://www.mercatornet.com/articles/view/testament_of_youth/
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
pifilsofimos



Geregistreerd op: 10-9-2007
Berichten: 668

BerichtGeplaatst: 02 Aug 2009 9:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Sterker en emotioneler dan 'Testament of Youth' zijn 'Chronicle of Youth', haar dagboek en Letters from a lost generation', correspondentie tussen haar, Victor, Roland.

Hieronder een stukje van een biografisch artikel waar ik enkele jaren geleden mee bezig was.

Verhaal Leighton en Brittain

Dit is een foto van Vera Brittain in 1913. Vera was een meisje uit een bemiddeld ‘middle class’ gezin (haar vader was mededirecteur van een papierfabriek opgericht door de grootvader) en had een schitterende toekomst voor zich. Ze was intelligent, welbespraakt en al zeer vlug bewust dat een ‘vrouw’ zijn een grote handicap was in een nog steeds erg op mannen gerichte samenleving. De seksistische houding van haar vader (meisjes moeten thuisblijven tot hun huwelijk) maakte haar rebels (the disadvantages of being a woman have eaten like iron into my soul) en verhoogt haar belangstelling voor het feminisme en als ze in 1913 een studiebeurs krijgt om in Oxford te studeren aan Sommerville College, is dit voor haar een uitgelezen kans om te ontsnappen aan het saaie provinciale stadje ‘Buxton’ en aan de benauwende sfeer thuis. Haar vader verzet zich aanvankelijk en noemt het een ‘unsuitable step’ for a girl.
Vera zou niet alleen zijn in Oxford. Haar twee jaar jongere broer Edward zou haar vergezellen, samen met vriend Roland Aubrey Leighton . Victor Richardson, een andere vriend zou in Camebridge studeren . Alledrie hadden ze school gelopen in de public school
Uppingham in Rutland. Er ontstond een hechte vriendschap tussen de drie (ze worden door Leightons moeder de drie Musketiers genoemd). Vera ontmoet Leighton voor het eerst in 1913 op ‘Old Boys’ day in de school, en als Leighton in de paasvakantie van 1914 een paar dagen bij hen verblijft in Buxton , ontluikt er een romance tussen hen..
Leighton was een briljant student, sleepte de ene prijs na de andere in de wacht in Uppingham School en was een leidersfiguur. Hij had als zoon van twee professionele schrijvers ook literair talent en de gesprekken die hij met Vera voerde gingen vaak over poëzie, over boeken die ze hadden gelezen, over filosofische vraagstukken. Gesprekken op een hoog intellectueel niveau. Vera schrijft over Leighton ‘he seems even in a short acquaintance to share both my faults and my talents and my ideas in a way that I have never found in anyone else yet’
(twee handen op een buik dus).
Edward lijkt zelfs wat jaloers en in bedekte termen maakt hij duidelijk aan Roland dat zijn gesprekken met Vera hen uit elkaar zouden kunnen drijven. Die uitspraak verbaast Vera want ‘he and I have always been friends, and I do not think there is a greater difference between you and him than there is between him and me.
Het is interessant om even terug te keren naar de opleiding die de drie jongens hebben genoten in Uppingham School. Het was een strenge, harde school geschoeid op militaire leest. Zo kon je aan geen enkele sportwedstrijd deelnemen of een prijs winnen zonder geslaagd te zijn voor een schiettest. Zoals in alle public school was er een OTC, een officer training corps aan verbonden. De studenten moesten klaargestoomd worden om in oorlogstijd als officier in het leger te gaan.
De culturele bagage die die jongens meekregen van hun leraars was gebaseerd op de ridderlijke tradities die je kon terugvinden in de klassieke werken van Homerus zoals de Ilias en de Odyssee of in de verhalen van King Arthur. Belangrijke waarden waren zelfopoffering, fair play, onvoorwaardelijke vaderlandsliefde, eer en plichtsbesef.
.............
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45652

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Jun 2011 18:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

One of the most memorable literary traditions of the Great War involves the post-war pilgrimage of V.A.D. Nurse and author Vera Brittain to the grave of her brother Edward on the Asiago Plateau. He had been killed in the very battle the Francis Mackay so clearly describes in the excellent new addition to the Battleground Europe series, Asiago. Mackay not only provides comprehensive information on all the related action plus details on Edward's death, but help for the tourist intent on recreating the famous pilgrimage to his grave described in Testament of Youth, his sister's classic war memoir.

This excerpt includes selections on both the assault which led to Edward's death and information on his subsequent internment. This took place around what is know alternatively as the Battle of Asiago or Operation Radeztky, part of an even larger action known as the Battle of the Piave. We pick up Francis Mackay's description the evening of the battle.

Lees verder op:
http://www.worldwar1.com/itafront/vbp.htm
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
pifilsofimos



Geregistreerd op: 10-9-2007
Berichten: 668

BerichtGeplaatst: 23 Jun 2011 8:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Zie ook :

http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=23073
&highlight=vera+brittain
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45652

BerichtGeplaatst: 23 Jun 2011 8:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Zal ik deze inhoud bij het andere topic gaan voegen? Want zo is het inderdaad verspreide informatie en dat is zonde.
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Boeken en recensies Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group