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Project Façade, leerzaam of..

 
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Yvonne
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BerichtGeplaatst: 11 Okt 2005 22:43    Onderwerp: Project Façade, leerzaam of.. Reageer met quote

Paddy Hartley, een kunstenaar, maakt kunst die je aan kunt trekken. Van 2004 tot 2006 is hij bezig met "Project Façade". Hij wil installaties en kleding maken die je moet laten invoelen hoe de gewonden in de Eerste Wereldoorlog werden opgelapt. Veel jonge mannen waren in hun gezicht geschoten, waardoor gedeeltes daarvan ontbraken. Weefseltransplantatie stond nog in de kinderschoenen. Als bijvoorbeeld iemands neus weg was, werden er stukken huid van het voorhoofd op de neus gehecht. Maar in tegenstelling tot de moderne methodes, werd deze huid niet losgesneden van het voorhoofd. Zodoende hadden deze patienten gedurende enige tijd vreemde rollen van vel over hun gezicht. Zodra het vel vastgegroeid was, werd de resterende huid weer op het voorhoofd terug gezet.
Een belangrijk deel van Project Façade is het in kaart brengen van de operaties, waarbij ook contact wordt gezocht met de nabestaanden om het persoonlijke verhaal achter de foto's te achterhalen. Check hun case-studies
Bron:
http://retecool.com/comments.php?id=11113_0_1_0_C%20.
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Laatst aangepast door Yvonne op 12 Okt 2005 12:39, in toaal 2 keer bewerkt
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BerichtGeplaatst: 11 Okt 2005 22:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

An Artistic Response To The Gillies Archive


Over the course of the next two years, Paddy Hartley will be creating new sculpture in response to the patient records of First World War Servicemen collated by Dr Andrew Bamji which together form The Gillies Archive held at Queen Mary's Hospital, Sidcup (QMH). These documents provide a rare and unique insight into the origins and development of surgical facial reconstruction techniques pioneered by New Zealander Sir Harold Delf Gillies and his surgical team based at the QMH facility during and after The First World War. A major aim of the project is to trace family members of some of the servicemen treated by Gillies and his team during this period and tell some of the personal stories and recollections of how these extraordinary men coped with their injuries in everyday life.


The work Paddy is producing explores and responds to the historical origins of surgical facial reconstruction documented at The Gillies Archive at Queen Mary's Hospital, Sidcup. Though it is hard to find any positive aspects of the effects of war and conflict on society as a whole, it is without question that the surgical techniques pioneered by Gillies and his team to repair the horrific facial injuries inflicted upon Servicemen formed the foundation of modern-day facial reconstruction from which many tens of thousands of people have benefited. It is important to add that the ground-breaking work of Gillies predates the remarkable work of Archibald McIndoe and his association with The Guinea Pig Club during World War Two.

The First World War was a truly global conflict and is reflected in the case histories of Servicemen treated at QMH. In addition to the records of Servicemen from the United Kingdom, The Gillies Archive holds the records of New Zealand and Canadian Servicemen. The Royal College of Surgeons Australia in Melbourne holds the records of Australian Servicemen and Paddy is respond to individual case histories of men from across the services and across the Commonwealth. This project is not a commemoration of Commonwealth valour alone as Paddy intends to attempt to trace any records of similarly injured men from other nations involved in the conflict including Germany, France, Russia and the United States.

This initial period of examination and familiarization with particular servicemen's case histories will result with the production of wearable, transformational, sculpture garments for the face and upper torso derived from the Military uniforms which the Servicemen wore, the cloth of these sculptural garments being representative of the skin. Many of the works will also be derived from the hospital uniforms the Servicemen wore whilst being treated and the regular day cloths of the period that discharged Servicemen wore in their everyday lives.

These wearable body sculptures will, wherever possible will be constructed from original First World War uniforms and will tell the individual stories of the bravery of Commonwealth Servicemen who suffered major facial trauma and who underwent experimental, developmental facial reconstructive surgery during, and in the years following the First World War. These wearable, sculptural garments will incorporate digitally printed and digitally embroidered images taken directly from records held at the archive that include photographs, surgical sketches by artist/surgeons such as Henry Tonks, hand written notes and official and unofficial follow up photographs. Surgical techniques such as the use of the pedicle tube to transport skin from other parts of the body to the face will feature heavily in the work.

The face, particularly in the case of these Servicemen can tell a lot about the person and their life experiences. It can be said that a person wears their history on their face. The same can be said about the uniforms. The very nature of the uniform removes the personality of the wearer and, amongst other uniformed men, one becomes a mere unit. However throughout the active service of an individual, the service history of the person is built into the garment, not just through natural wear and tear, but also through the addition of rank, insignia, service chevrons, wound bars and medals. It is this individuality that Paddy intends to build into his sculptures. As the Servicemen must remain anonymous, features that allude to the individual's stories will hint to the identity of the men. When dealing with the Servicemen of the First World War, names to a certain degree become unimportant as the soldier, sailor and airman of this conflict really was the typical 'Everyman'.

It is important to add that Paddy does not seek to recreate, nor sensationalize the horrific injuries of these extraordinary men, but to illustrate and explain the treatments they endured in the surgical pursuit of regaining a face that was as recognisable as their own before they were injured as was possible and how they coped with their rehabilitation back into society.
http://www.projectfacade.com/index.php/about/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 11 Okt 2005 22:46    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Case studies:
http://www.projectfacade.com/index.php/case/

En de hele site:
http://www.projectfacade.com/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 11 Okt 2005 23:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

http://www.projectfacade.com/index.php/about/comments/tin_facial_prosthetics

Tin Facial Prosthetics by Ladd and Wood



View amazing silent film clips of Anna Coleman Ladd and Francis Derwent Wood making and fitting tin facial prosthetics to injured servicemen circa 1916.

A number of artists were associated with the production of facial prostheses for servicemen whose injuries were so severe that they required partial masks to give the appearance of a ‘complete face’.

Whilst Coleman Ladd worked under the auspices of the American Red Cross at Val-de-Grace Military Hospital near Paris, Derwent Wood was attached to the Third London General Hospital in what became known as the ‘Tin Noses Shop’. Although the masks were uncomfortable and unpopular, the facial prosthetics were produced partly because of economic necessity. Injured servicemen needed to provide for themselves and their families after they left the forces and feel as included in society as possible. The Paris studio alone produced 220 masks between 1918 and 1919 and many masks covered only small portions of the face such as the nose or eye.

ladd portrait
Derwent Wood said of his work, ‘my work begins where that of the surgeon ends. When the surgeon has done all he can to restore function, to heal wounds, to support fleshy tissue by bone grafting, I endeavour by means of the skill I happen to possess as a sculptor to make a mans face as near as possible to what it would look like before he was wounded’. Even so, the unmistakable sheen of oil paint on metal meant that many of the injured men still felt conspicuous which explains why may trained as projectionists in the new branch of the entertainment industry, cinema. Men could arrive at work before anyone else, spend their working day alone and leave at night once everyone had left. One could say that at the time, the masks were made just as much for the benefit of the viewer as the wearer.
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Laatst aangepast door Yvonne op 11 Okt 2005 23:26, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
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BerichtGeplaatst: 11 Okt 2005 23:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Gillies Archive



A series of coincidences resulted in the discovery of a remarkable collection of material that documents the development of plastic surgery at the beginning of the 20th Century. Each Dominion detachment removed its records after the war; it was assumed that the British records had been donated to the Royal College of Surgeons and destroyed when the College was bombed in the Second War.

The New Zealand records (the Macalister Archive) resurfaced when rescued by Sandy Macalister, Professor of Oral Surgery at the Dental School in Dunedin from imminent destruction, and he generously donated them to Queen Mary’s Hospital in 1989. After publication of a brief article about these in 1993, the British records (the Gillies Archive) emerged from hiding at Queen Mary’s Hospital, Roehampton, where they had languished, almost untouched, since 1925. They include many cases illustrated by Gillies in his seminal textbook, “Plastic Surgery of the Face”, published in 1920. Altogether the archives contain over 2500 records. Most of the case notes are in their original folders and contain notes, photographs, diagrams and X-ray photographs. The New Zealand records also contain a series of 98 watercolours and a life-sized wax model illustrating surgical techniques.

The Australian section’s records are preserved in the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons in Melbourne and the U.S. section at Harvard Medical Library. The Canadian records have disappeared.

Queen’s Hospital patients of this era were almost exclusively servicemen. Most were soldiers, with a smaller number of Navy and Flying Corps personnel, some of whom had suffered severe burns. The records include rank, number, regiment and date of wounding so the action in which they were wounded can often be identified. The Gillies Archives are probably the most important and complete collection of war surgery records of their age in the world.
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BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Okt 2005 7:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Nu heb ik begrepen dat dit een rondreizend iets wordt, dus Europa zal zeker aangedaan worden.
Als je op de site rondkijkt zie je dat er ontzettend veel research wordt gedaan, maar
Quote:
Hij wil installaties en kleding maken die je moet laten invoelen hoe de gewonden in de Eerste Wereldoorlog werden opgelapt

zou iemand van hier naar deze gebeurtenis gaan?
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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Sep 2007 20:33    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

http://www.projectfacade.com/index.php?#blog

Het geheel begint nu toch vorm te krijgen.
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rolffie61



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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Sep 2007 20:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ja, ik zou wel willen voelen wat het betekent als je darmen eruit gerukt worden door een granaat, je uren ligt te wachten tot het avond is eer de brancardiers je opzoeken en je onderwijl vergaat van de dorst maar niet kan en mag drinken, vervolgens met een brancard over hobbelig terrein teruggevoerd wordt naar een oplappost waar je misschien voor de kick wat morfine krijgt of niet, dan een tijd wachten voor je aan de beurt bent terwijl de pijn weer erger wordt en uiteindelijk na een beroerde maar spannende anesthesie waarin je de shock net te boven komt, weer wakker wordt en terug naar zaal, je mede re-enacters bij bosjes het loodje leggen en schreeuwen om hulp, waar je nog steeds niet kunt drinken en het dorstgevoel steeds erger wordt, maar ja infuzen had je toen nog niet en uiteindelijk ten onder gaat aan de zeer intrigerende pijnen van een buikvliesontsteking.
Na afloop kun je inderdaad zeggen: wat een belevenis! Het was net of ik er bij was geweest!

Is er ook nazorg betreffende een wellicht opkomende Post Re-enactment Stress?

Ik heb de website nog niet uitgebreid gelezen en moest dat waarschijnlijk wel doen voor ik dit voorgaande schreef. Zal wel over andere onderdelen van de (militaire) geneeskunde gaan. Op zich een prima en onderzoekswaardig onderwerp, maar dat gedoe dat je alles "moet beleven", ik weet het niet, hoor.
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Mrt 2008 13:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

[dubbele post verwijderd]
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