Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

Joseph Persico: Eleventh Month, Eleventh Day, Eleventh Hour

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Boeken en recensies Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Aug 2006 23:03    Onderwerp: Joseph Persico: Eleventh Month, Eleventh Day, Eleventh Hour Reageer met quote

Quote:
Eleventh Month, Eleventh Day, Eleventh Hour: Armistice Day, 1918
World War I and Its Violent Climax




by Joseph E. Persico (Random House, 460 pages, $29.95, ISBN 0-375-50825-2)

Persico book looks at tragedy, paradox of WWI's final hours

"Never have so many experienced such intensity of emotions; never had comradeship--a sense of needing and being needed--struck so deeply and bound prior strangers so strongly in a blood brotherhood." - Joseph Persico (from his latest book)

Joseph Persico's new book about World War I eloquently examines three paradoxes about the Great War and war in general.

The Germans, exhausted by four years of war, signed an armistice with the Allies at 5:10 a.m. on November 11, 1918. The Armistice set the end of the war at 11 a.m. that morning and included a German guarantee to withdraw from Belgium and France within two weeks.

Persico, a historian and biographer who lives in Guilderland, describes how nearly 11,000 American, British, French and German soldiers were killed or wounded between the signing of the Armistice and the cease-fire.

In his previous books, many of which have considered war and warriors, Persico has undertaken careful and comprehensive research. He has offered readable, balanced portrayals of people and events.

The research and readability are constants in this book. Further, the writing in Armistice Day, 1918 makes this one of Persico's best books. It is noteworthy compared to other recent titles on World War I.

However, World War I seems to have pushed Persico a bit away from his preferred position as dispassionate observer. The reader senses his controlled frustration with the generals' judgements. Sometimes, it seems Persico wants to step back in time and slap some sense into the Kaiser and Allied heads of state, along with a few of the generals.

Needless Deaths

His frustration arises from the fact that the 11,000 casualties were needless. They occurred in battles over territory that the Germans had pledged to leave and had already started to leave.

The casualties occurred because Allied battlefield commanders were reluctant to end the war. British Field Marshall Douglas Haig wanted to recapture the city of Mons to restore England's honor. Mons was the first place in 1914 where the Germans forced the British to retreat. Before meeting the Germans for armistice talks, French Field Marshall Ferdinand Foch stated his objective was "to pursue the feldgrauen (Germans) with a sword at their back."

American General John "Black Jack" Pershing wanted unconditional surrender. He considered armistice a weak Allied response; rapidly arriving Americans would win the war.

Even after the Armistice was a fact, ambiguous orders and the unreliability of battlefield communications guaranteed casualties. Of 16 American divisions, for example, the generals of nine ordered or allowed their troops to attack strongly defended German positions.

Germans faced with rows of advancing soldiers fired to avoid being killed. Artillery batteries rained down shells, to avoid ending the war with unused ammunition.

Many Allied and German soldiers knew the morning of November 11th that the war was due to end shortly. Despite this knowledge, few if any soldiers, deserted or lay down their arms.

Mystique of Warfare

This experience is the basis of the second paradox. Persico found writings by many soldiers which described the pointlessness of the war. Yet, for many soldiers, survivors and casualties, "the trenches exercised a near mystical grip" over their occupants - - both Germans and Allies.

"Never," Persico continues, have so many "experienced such intensity of emotions; never had comradeship - - a sense of needing and being needed - - struck so deeply and bound prior strangers so strongly in a blood brotherhood."

"Armistice Day, 1918" is based on the personal papers of soldiers and civilians, official histories of each army and more than 100 books about the overall history of the war or particular topics.

Drawing from these sources, Persico followed the experiences of about 30 soldiers and civilians who survived the war. He includes the experiences of several dozen others who did not survive. He does a superb job in providing a cross section of all people in the war, particularly Germans, who often appear as faceless barbarians in other World War I histories.

Some of the people who Persico follows are well known, such as President Woodrow Wilson, Adolph Hitler, a corporal, and Douglas MacArthur, a young officer. Others, such as American Joe Rizzi or the German Fritz Nagel, are not well-known but have equally compelling stories.

Persico includes a vivid sketch of Henry Johnson, an African American hero from Albany. His description of Johnson's battlefield valor makes it easy to understand why, more than 80 years later, people continue to advocate that Johnson receive the Medal of Honor.

After a suspenseful opening chapter setting the stage on the morning of November 11th, the chapters in the book are arranged in chronological order. Each opens with information on November 11th and then includes background information on how battles or events earlier in the war influenced the moment under consideration.

Along with the chronological information, each chapter considers the flu epidemic, the development of new weapons such as tanks and poisonous gas, the way in which the war rapidly dehumanized its participants and the things that soldiers did to relieve the tedium and terror of trench warfare. Also included are 30 sharp black and white photographs of battlefields and people in the book.

Final Paradox

The last paradox is that war is so terrible, yet so inevitable. "Those who instigate wars," Persico observes "are not blind to their horrors but undeterred by them. Lives lost are only a purchase price which a leader is willing to pay for objectives, noble or ignoble."


http://www.albany.edu/writers-inst/gaz_persico_joseph.html

Zie tevens
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=1352
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Pegoud
Moderator


Geregistreerd op: 28-3-2005
Berichten: 7633
Woonplaats: Brabant

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Aug 2006 12:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Hebben! Smile Op vakantie in Ierland getackeld, in begonnen maar nog niet uitgelezen, wel origineel thema. Veel gebruik van dagboeken en soortgelijke ego-documenten. Ik laat het weten bij recencies maar het begint veelbelovend.

Gr P
_________________
Wie achter de kudde aanloopt, sjouwt altijd door de stront.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
marcston



Geregistreerd op: 18-3-2006
Berichten: 853
Woonplaats: Eindhoven

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Aug 2006 12:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Pegoud @ 22 Aug 2006 13:37 schreef:
Hebben! Smile Op vakantie in Ierland getackeld, in begonnen maar nog niet uitgelezen, wel origineel thema. Veel gebruik van dagboeken en soortgelijke ego-documenten. Ik laat het weten bij recencies maar het begint veelbelovend.

Gr P


Ik vond het een ontzettend goed boek, het springt wat op en neer door de tijdlijnen en is daarom wat verwarrend. Het boek is wel echt vanuit de "soldaat geschreven" met veel persoonlijke herinneringen.

De insteek van het boek is dat de geallieerden (en Duitsers) op 11-11-1918 evenveel of meer verliezen leden dan op D-day 1944. van mijn familie heb ik ook begrepen dat juist de laatste dagen nog het felst gevochten werd, alleen waren de verliezen van eerstgenoemde dag nutteloos:-(


Er is ook een gesproken versie van die boek,
http://www.audible.com/adbl/site/products/ProductDetail.jsp?productID=BK_BKOT_000331&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes
_________________
Strange women lying in ponds, distributing swords is NO basis for a system of government.
(Monty Python on the Excalibur makes you king legend!)
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
derwisj



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 7603
Woonplaats: aalst

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Aug 2006 21:57    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Heb het boek ook gelezen, en stel mij eigenlijk de vraag of de verliezen eigenlijk wel nutteloos waren; als je het later bekijkt wel, maar als je het op dezelfde dag bekijkt, er was een wapenstilstand; dit betekende dat er niet meer geschoten werd, maar betekende officieel niet het einde van de oorlog; wat als het een trucje was van de duitsers om hun linies te versterken??? Dat was denk ik de gedachte achter de aanvallen van 11.11...de wapenstilstand ingaan in een zo sterk mogelijke positie om als eventueel de strijd hervat werd er zo goed mogelijk uit te komen...
pascal
_________________
http://www.feitelijkverenigd.be/wp-content/uploads/2005/08/banner-CTIDK-bovenaan.jpg
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 23 Aug 2006 5:59    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Goed punt, maar dat hangt er denk ik ook vanaf hoe zwaar er de dagen voor de laatste dag gevochten is toch? Staat dat in verhouding?
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
marcston



Geregistreerd op: 18-3-2006
Berichten: 853
Woonplaats: Eindhoven

BerichtGeplaatst: 23 Aug 2006 7:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

derwisj @ 22 Aug 2006 22:57 schreef:
Heb het boek ook gelezen, en stel mij eigenlijk de vraag of de verliezen eigenlijk wel nutteloos waren; als je het later bekijkt wel, maar als je het op dezelfde dag bekijkt, er was een wapenstilstand; dit betekende dat er niet meer geschoten werd, maar betekende officieel niet het einde van de oorlog; wat als het een trucje was van de duitsers om hun linies te versterken??? Dat was denk ik de gedachte achter de aanvallen van 11.11...de wapenstilstand ingaan in een zo sterk mogelijke positie om als eventueel de strijd hervat werd er zo goed mogelijk uit te komen...
pascal


Leuk dat er meer zijn die dit boek gelezen hebben.

Op zich een goed punt, vanaf nu gezien zijn de verliezen op die dag nutteloos. Vanuit toen kan dat natuurlijk nut gehad hebben, misschien te vergelijken met de Israelische/Hezbollah acties net voor de wapenstilstand.

Om hier verder mee te komen lijkt mij dat we dan het volgende moeten bekijken.
Of de laatste dag bewust alleen werd aangevallen waar betere posities te verkrijgen waren (tactisch en strategisch) of gewoon over de hele linie een offensieve push?

Weet hier imeand
_________________
Strange women lying in ponds, distributing swords is NO basis for a system of government.
(Monty Python on the Excalibur makes you king legend!)
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Pegoud
Moderator


Geregistreerd op: 28-3-2005
Berichten: 7633
Woonplaats: Brabant

BerichtGeplaatst: 23 Aug 2006 21:46    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Van wat ik heb gelezen springt het inderdaad een beetje van de hak op de tak qua chronologie, personen worden echt gedurende de hele oorlog belicht. Het thema sprak me direct aan een ik ben benieuwd of iemand ooit nog iets dergelijks schrijft over de eerste dag van de oorlog, misschien een aardig idee voor de auteur zelf.
Het lijkt me overigens vrij misdadig om een aanval te plannen om 10:30 uur als bekend is dat de wapenstilstand om 11:00 uur ingaat en het schijnt echt te zijn gebeurd. Nou ja, in het licht van alle gruwelen van vier lange jaren kon dat er ook nog wel bij, denk ik.

Gr P
_________________
Wie achter de kudde aanloopt, sjouwt altijd door de stront.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
derwisj



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 7603
Woonplaats: aalst

BerichtGeplaatst: 23 Aug 2006 22:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ja, maar als je om 10:30 de kans ziet een mooie strategische heuvelrug te veroveren...ik herhaal het was een wapenstilstand, en doorheen de geschiedenis zijn heel wat wapenstilstanden geschonden...niemand kon er 100% zeker van zijn wat de duitsers gingen doen...
pascal
_________________
http://www.feitelijkverenigd.be/wp-content/uploads/2005/08/banner-CTIDK-bovenaan.jpg
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Boeken en recensies Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group