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Otto Dix

 
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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Feb 2008 12:07    Onderwerp: Otto Dix Reageer met quote

Op deze link zijn werken van Dix te zien:
http://minnesota.institute.arts.museum/viewer/index.php?v=4&dept=2&artist=833
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BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Jul 2008 17:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

German soldier's ugly art

According to Jim, an attendant at the the National Gallery of Victoria, feelings ran high last Anzac Day against the exhibition of 51 drawings and etchings by Otto Dix, a German artist/soldier.

'In Adelaide,' he says, 'there were even some attempts to damage the prints.'

This is an exhibition that indeed provokes strong reactions from observers with its often grotesque and always confronting depictions of the realities of war on the Western Front during WWI. Dix said that 'there was a dimension of reality that had not been dealt with in art: the dimension of ugliness'.

In this exhibition there is an excess of ugliness. Mealtime in the Trenches depicts a soldier gulping down a hasty meal apparently indifferent to the human skeleton trapped in the frozen landscape beside him.

Equally harrowing are images of corpses ripped apart by bullets and bombs, dying soldiers and the victims of poison gas (ironically entitled The Sleepers of Fort Vaux). No wonder the Oxford Companion to Twentieth Century Art describes Dix's cycle of prints as 'perhaps the most powerful as well as the most unpleasant anti-war statements in modern art'.

Born in 1891 Dix the artist volunteered as a machine-gunner, fought at the Somme in 1915 and was wounded a number of times, once almost fatally. My uncle was wounded at the Somme at the age of 17 (almost fatally too) and suffered for the rest of his life the effects of poison gas and a wound that fascinated us as children. We constantly pestered him to hold up his arm so we could see the sky though the hole in his wrist. I wondered if Dix had been the machine-gunner who had wounded my uncle and changed his life forever.

Jim, who paces this exhibition floor-space with a vigilance approaching maternal anxiety, admits that one drawing in particular is 'most disturbing'. This is plate 51, Soldier Raping a Nun, a horrific image which was suppressed when this portfolio of images was first published in 1924. Dix's publisher believed (understandably) that the image would be seen as a 'slap in the face for all those who celebrate our "heroes" [and] ... for all those who have a bourgeois conception of a front-line soldier'.

Nations need to believe in the nobility of their soldiers. Anything less would be unbearable and unacceptable to their myth-making. As a nation we cope with war by concentrating on stories of bravery not its ghastly acts. Valour informs a nation's myth-making, leaving no room for the unspeakable. Such myth-construction is a necessary bulwark against the reality of acts too dreadful to face.

The paradox infusing this exhibition is that Dix never considered himself a pacifist nor was he interested in politics. He never intended his work to be taken as anti-war propaganda. He was horrified by war yet fascinated by his experiences. 'I was not seeking to depict ugliness,' he said. 'Everything I saw was beautiful.'

But by allowing an aesthetic to overlay moral questions around war are we merely glamorising and further mythologising its horrors?

Jim was a soldier for five years and only missed out on being sent to Vietnam on the accession of the Whitlam government. He's recently forbidden his son to join the army. 'I've seen what happens,' he says,' when some people pick up guns — they go crazy.' He's Croatian in origin and understands first-hand what happens when you expose deep differences between cultures and religions.

It's difficult to know whether to feel pride or shame for our participation in past wars. Does our myth-making provide a convenient excuse merely to repeat the same conflicts endlessly?

Of the 51 images in Dix's exhibition only one, Bomb Crater with Flowers (pictured), offers any sense of hope. Battlefields do get covered over and horrors do fade. But perhaps it's the mythology that grows out of war that we're still not quite sure how to interpret.


War: The Prints of Otto Dix is at the National Gallery of Victoria until 10 August, then will head to the Art Gallery of NSW from 22 August until 26 October. Otto Dix's Der Krieg Cycle of prints is owned by the National Gallery in Canberra.

© http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=7225
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BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Jul 2008 17:24    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Art of War
Otto Dix’s Der Krieg [War]

Otto Dix was born in 1891 in Untermhaus, Thuringia, the son of an ironworker. He initially trained in Gera and at the Dresden School of Arts and Crafts as a painter of wall decorations and later taught himself how to paint on canvas. He volunteered as a machine-gunner during World War I and in the autumn of 1915 he was sent to the Western Front. He was at the Somme during the major allied offensive of 1916.

After the war he studied at the academies of Dresden and Dusseldorf. Together with George Grosz, he was one of the leading exponents of the artistic movement Die Neue Sachlichkeit [New Objectivity], a form of social realist art which unsentimentally examined the decadence and underlying social inequality of post-war German society. With the rise of the National Socialists in 1933, Dix was dismissed from his teaching post at the Dresden Academy. He moved south to Lake Constance and was only allowed to continue practising as an artist after he agreed to relinquish overtly political subject matter in favour of landscape painting. Dix was conscripted into the army during World War II and in 1945 was captured and put into a prisoner of war camp. He returned to Dresden after the war where his paintings became more religiously reflective of his war-time experiences. He died in 1969.[1]

Der Krieg [War] 1924 arose out of Dix’s own experiences of the horrors of war. As outlined above, he had volunteered for service in the army and fought as a machine-gunner on the Western Front. He was wounded a number of times, once almost fatally. War profoundly affected him as an individual and as an artist, and he took every opportunity, both during his active service and afterwards, to document his experiences. These experiences would become the subject matter of many of his later paintings and are central to the Der Krieg cycle.

Der Krieg itself, as a cycle of prints (51 in total), is consciously modelled on Goya’s [1746–1828] equally famous and equally devastating Los Desastres de la Guerra [The disasters of war]. Los Desastres detailed Goya’s own account of the horrors of the Napoleonic invasion and the Spanish War of Independence from 1808 to 1814. Goya’s cycle of 82 etchings, which he worked on for a decade after the Spanish War of Independence were not, however, published until 1863, long after his death.

Like Los Desastres, Der Krieg uses a variety of etching techniques and does so with an equally astonishing facility. Similarly, it exploits the cumulative possibilities of a long sequence of images and mirrors Goya’s unflinching, stark realism in terms of its fundamental presentation. GH Hamilton describes Dix’s cycle as ‘perhaps the most powerful as well as the most unpleasant anti-war statements in modern art… It was truly this quality of unmitigated truth, truth to the most commonplace and vulgar experiences, as well as the ugly realities of psychological experience, that gave his work a strength and consistency attained by no other contemporary artist, not even by [George] Grosz…’[2] It has become a commonplace to see this cycle as an admonition against the barbarity of war. And there is no doubt that as a human document it is a powerful cautionary work. At a psychological level, however, its truth goes deeper than this. Dix was both horrified and fascinated by the experience of war.

In 1963, explaining why he volunteered for the army in the First World War he had this to say:

I had to experience how someone beside me suddenly falls over and is dead and the bullet has hit him squarely. I had to experience that quite directly. I wanted it. I’m therefore not a pacifist at all – or am I? Perhaps I was an inquisitive person. I had to see all that myself. I’m such a realist, you know, that I have to see everything with my own eyes in order to confirm that it’s like that. I have to experience all the ghastly, bottomless depths of life for myself…[3]

In the same interview, he also had this to say:

As a young man you don’t notice at all that you were, after all, badly affected. For years afterwards, at least ten years, I kept getting these dreams, in which I had to crawl through ruined houses, along passages I could hardly get through…[4]

This nightmarish, hallucinatory quality pervades all of the Der Krieg images. Paradoxically, there is also a quality of sensuousness, an almost perverse delight in the rendering of horrific detail, which indicates that there was perhaps, in Dix’s case, an almost addictive quality to the hyper-sensory input of war. In terms of the general corpus of Dix’s work, Der Krieg occupies a central place amongst the large number of paintings and works-on-paper devoted to the theme of war. The work is astonishingly powerful and, as stated above, it remains one of the most powerful indictments of war ever conceived. It is universally regarded as one of the great masterpieces of twentieth century. Dix’s oeuvre as a whole, and Der Krieg in particular, was hugely influential on a number of other twentieth century artist such as Ben Shahn, Pablo Picasso and Robert Motherwell.

The etchings were printed by Kupferdruckerei O. Felsing in Charlottenburg on BSB Maschinen Butten and Kupferdruck paper under Dix’s supervision. The portfolio was published by Karl Nierendorf, Berlin, as five separate folios each of 10 prints in an edition of 70 in 1924. The edition the National Gallery of Australia has acquired is numbered 58/70. The portfolio also includes the impression of Soldat und Nonne [Soldier and nun], depicting the rape of a nun by a soldier, which was suppressed in the published version of the suite.

Otto Dix is one of the greatest artists of the first half of the 20th century and his visual legacy, including his Der Krieg cycle, with its still relevant contemporary echoes, is one of the most powerful documents of man’s inhumanity to man that we have available to us today. Its acquisition represents a major coup for the Gallery having been on the Department of International Prints desiderata list for years.



Mark Henshaw
Curator
Department of International Prints, Drawings
and Illustrated Books



Notes
[1] Biographical details sourced from Harold Osborne [ed], The Oxford Companion to Twentieth Century Art, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1981 and Jane Turner [ed], The Dictionary of Art, London: Macmillan, New York; distributed by Grove Dictionaries, 1996
[2] Osborne [ed].
[3] interview with Maria Wetzel at www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk
[4] Also quoted at www.historical.org

© http://www.nga.gov.au/Dix/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Jul 2008 20:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Het is leuk om te merken that 90 jaren later , Otto kan nog ieman stroren.
Toch iets die can tegen het commonwealth nationalism gaan.
Punk's not dead.
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Aug 2010 18:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Olaf Peters calls the representational, highly topical style of painter Otto Dix "intransigent realism." In this, Peters marvels at the brute power and unstinting frankness the subject of his curation brought to his depiction of the world, and especially people, around him. Dix's portraits and social comments flirt with caricature, but, unlike George Grosz, his cohort in Dada subversion, Dix rarely distilled his jaundiced point of view into scalding cartoon (his 1924 print cycle Der Krieg - "War" - a notable exception). Rather, he chronicled his time and place by describing the psychological mindset(s) of human beings he knew and observed in a manner at once redolent with art-historical affect and preoccupied with the brittle, ravaged psyche he felt in the civilization around him. However dated Dix's art may now seem - not only by its Weimar-era harshness but by its equally aggressive conjuration of northern Renaissance and Baroque predecessors - its power and facility lend it a tortured authority that grips you at the beginning of his retrospective and doesn't let go. Buy the ticket and gird the loins.

At its outset, "Otto Dix," the painter's first major survey in the Western Hemisphere, curated by Peters, dumps us, appropriately enough, in the trenches, and viscera, of the First World War. Der Krieg, Dix's answer to (well, echo of) Goya, is the focus here, but drawings of everything from brains and intestines to camp-following prostitutes augment the grotesque immersion afforded by the cycle of fifty etchings. Dix served as a machine gunner through much of the fighting - it's a miracle he lived to paint the tale - and he regurgitated his experience with a viciousness born as much from detachment as from revulsion

Zo mooi, kijk verder:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/peter-frank/blague-dart-dixs-mix-no-q_b_692564.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Dec 2010 11:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Born on December 2, 1891, in Untermhaus, Germany, Wilhelm Heinrich Otto Dix was a painter, printmaker and watercolourist. He is widely considered one of the most influential artists of the Weimar Republic of the 1920s.

From 1905-1914, Dixx trained as a decorative wall painter in Gera and Dresden. Starting in 1909, he taught himself easel painting focusing on portraits and landscapes. Dixx’s first paintings were in a veristic style, but after encountering works by Van Gogh and Futurism, he incorporated these into an Expressionistic style.

From 1914-1918, Dixx served in the German army where he made countless sketches of war scenes in both realistic and Cubo-Futurist manners. The experience of war, became a dominant motif of his work until the 1930s later saying that “War is something so animal-like: hunger, lice, slime, these crazy sounds … War was something horrible, but nonetheless something powerful … Under no circumstances could I miss it! It is necessary to see people in this unchained condition in order to know something about man.”

Following the War, Dix studied at the Dresden Akademie der Bildenden Künste and in 1919, was a founding member of the Dresdner Seccession, a group of radical Expressionist and Dada artists and writers. Dix depicted gruesome scenes of war and revolution, and depictions of legless, drastically disfigured war cripples. In 1920, he exhibited at the 1st International Dada Fair in Berlin. “Dix employed a mixed-media technique that fused painting and collage using found objects. In his printmaking he echoed the motifs of his paintings, resulting in five portfolios of engravings and one of woodcuts by 1922.”

In 1920 Dix returned to working in a veristic style. He drew nudes at the Akademie and painted portraits of friends and working-class models. His works also included socially critical motifs, scenes of brothels, and a large triptych entitled The Trench.

Dix received critical and commercial success after his shift to a revised form of realism. He had his first solo exhibition in 1923 at the Galerie I. B. Neumann in Berlin. In 1925 Dix was one of the leading painters of the Neue Sachlichkeit (New Objectivity), an art movement that arose in Germany as an outgrowth of, and in opposition to expressionism.

While Dix was gaining recognition, his work was also coming under attack. “The Trench”, which was purchased by for the Wallraf-Richartz-Museum in Cologne was perceived “anti-military” and the museum returned the painting. As well, Dix was accused of pornography after exhibiting his “Girl Before Mirror, of an aging prostitute. He was acquitted butright-winged political organizations continued to link him with left-wing plots to undermine German morality.

Dix moved to Düsseldorf in 1922 and married Martha Koch. Themes in his work were less political and he created a series of watercolours that depicted violent and/or morbid erotic subject matter. Dix also became favoured as a portrait painter of Germany’s theatrical and literary groups and their patrons.

Dix moved to Berlin in 1925 to be a part of the city’s art scene and to organize a series of exhibitions in Berlin, Munich and Dresden. He gained a professorship at the Dresden Akademie in 1926. In 1931, he was named as a member of the Preussische Akademie der Künste.

“While continuing to paint portraits and nudes, Dix injected an increasingly pessimistic and allegorical content into his work during the early 1930s. Nudes emerged as witches or personifications of melancholy”

After the Nazi election in 1933, Dix was stripped of his teaching position and all honours on the grounds that his paintings included morally offensive works that were “likely to adversely affect the military will of the German people”. He was forbidden to exhibit, and his work was confiscated from German museums to feature in various exhibitions of entartete Kunst (Degenerate Art).

Seeking seclusion, Dix moved first in 1934 to Randegger Castle near Singen and then in 1936 to Hemmenhofen, a small town on Lake Constance. “Participating in the ‘inner emigration’ of numerous German artists and intellectuals, supported by a small number of patrons, Dix employed a polemically significant Old Master technique, such as was also often advocated for Nazi art, emulating German Renaissance painters. He also changed his art’s most frequent content to the relatively neutral one of landscape, but landscape markedly bereft of human presence and in rejection of contemporary events.”

Dix was drafted into the German territorial army in 1945. He was captured by French troops, served as prisoner of war at Colmar after which he returned to Hemmenhofen. His work focused on portraits and self-portraits, Christian motifs, landscapes, and printmaking. “In politically divided Germany, he was unusual in his ability to negotiate between the West and East German regimes, making annual visits to Dresden, appointed to the academies of both West and East Berlin, and the recipient of major awards in both the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic.”

In his later years, Dix continued to work . In the 1950′s and 60′s he traveled a great deal, constantly exhibiting his work. In 1967, after traveling to Greece, he suffered a stroke which paralyzed his left hand. Otto Dix died in Singen, Germany, on July 25, 1969.

(c) http://www.dailyartfixx.com/2010/12/02/otto-dix-1891-1969/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Dec 2010 23:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ik zag over 2 weken in de Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlijn voor de eerste keer het origineel "Flandern" van Otto Dix. Magnifiek mooi schilderij is dat...

mvg, Wim D.
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2011 20:07    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Nu te zien in Bonn:
http://www.wechselausstellungen.de/bonn/gefuehl-ist-privatsache-otto-dix-george-grosz-und-die-neue-sachlichkeit/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2011 20:54    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Dank voor de tip !
Een dagje Bonn is te doen...

mvg, Wim D.
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2011 11:53    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De tentoonstelling die nu in Bonn te zien is geeft vooral een beeld van de tijd vlak na de eerste wereldoorlog in Duitsland: de armoede, de honger, decadentie, opkomend geweld.
Overigens in hetzelfde museumkwartier is een uitgebreide tentoonstelling te zien over Napoleon: Traum oder Trauma.
http://www.bundeskunsthalle.de/index.htm?ausstellungen/napoleon/index.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Jun 2011 21:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ik ben een fan Dix. Erg expressief en rauw, op het absurde af. Heb voor de gein in mijn onnozelheid wel eens online gekeken wat een werk van Dix vandaag de dag kost. Altijd een leuke investering, nietwaar? Die dingen kosten dus gewoon tonnen, haha! Nog even doorsparen dus.

Gr P
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Nov 2011 12:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ik zie dat zijn website hier nog niet vernoemd is:

http://www.otto-dix.de/start_html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Feb 2012 8:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Percy Toplis @ 06 Feb 2011 17:19 schreef:
Otto DIX: "Bei Langemark" (Februar 1918)



http://artsearch.nga.gov.au/Detail-LRG.cfm?View=LRG&IRN=128589&PICTAUS=TRUE
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BerichtGeplaatst: 24 Nov 2012 12:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Otto Dix ook op de pagina:

Visions of hell – Krieg in der Seele – The Great War as seen by Otto Dix.
http://godwithusww1.wordpress.com/2012/11/17/visions-of-hell-krieg-in-der-seele-the-great-war-as-seen-by-otto-dix/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 24 Nov 2012 12:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Das Kriegstagebuch Otto Dix
http://www.dctp.tv/filme/nzz-dix-kriegstagebuch/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 02 Dec 2012 12:40    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Otto Dix and The War

http://blog.oup.com/2012/12/otto-dix-and-the-war/
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