Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

What does S.O.S stand for?

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Algemeen Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16253
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Aug 2010 11:05    Onderwerp: What does S.O.S stand for? Reageer met quote

What does S.O.S stand for??

Commentaar 1

In popular usage to this day, the letters SOS (no periods) are commonly believed to be an acronym for:

Save Our Ship
Save Our Souls
Sink Or Swim

These are termed 'backronyms,' as explained below, and came into popular use AFTER SOS went into effect. In actuality, and as originally intended when SOS was introduced in 1908, the letters have no meaning.

SOS is a Morse "procedural signal” or "prosign." As the SOS signal is a ‘prosign’, its respective letters have no inherent meaning per se. In the simplest terms, SOS is a ‘SIGNAL’ indicating distress and the need for help, and not an acronym or abbreviation.

After SOS was first used by the steamship Arapahoe in 1909 (not the Titanic in 1912 as many people believe), people applied their own meanings to the letters. The most popular ones: "save our ship" and "save our souls." These are correctly termed ‘bacronyms.’

‘SOS’ was chosen because the three dots, three dashes, three dots are easy to transmit and not easily confused with other letters by the sender or recipients. With the advent of radios on ships beginning in the 1920s, ‘Mayday’ became, and still is, the International Distress Signal, but SOS served its purpose, for a while.

Commentaar 2

SOS does not stand for anything!

SOS is a very easily recognized set of morse code characters
Prior to the introduction of SOS, the morse code distress call was CQD
CQ is a general call (as in seek you)
The D was added to indicate distress
But CQD is _ ._ . _ _._ _.. (dah-di-dah-dit, dah-dah-di-dah, dah-di-dit), which is not easily recognizable in the din of noise that exists on short wave radio bands.
Another problem is that, following a normal CQ, the person transmitting sends the characters DE (meaning from) and his call sign. If the CQ and the DE are too close together, the call could be confused as CQD (E is just a single dot and could easily be lost in the noise).
SOS is much, much easier to recognize

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100806085734AAwABoZ
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16253
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Aug 2010 11:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Hiervan wordt in het eerste commantaar gewag gemaakt:

Backronym

A backronym or bacronym is a phrase constructed after the fact to make an existing word or words match an acronym. Backronyms may be invented with serious or humorous intent, or may be a type of false or folk etymology.

The word is a blend of backward and acronym, and has been defined as a "reverse acronym".[1] Its earliest known citation in print is as "bacronym" in the November 1983 edition of the Washington Post monthly neologism contest. The newspaper quoted winning reader "Meredith G. Williams of Potomac" defining it as the "same as an acronym, except that the words were chosen to fit the letters."[1]

Differences from acronyms
An acronym is a word derived from the initial letters of a phrase:[2] For example, the word radar comes from "Radio Detection and Ranging."[3]

By contrast, a backronym is constructed by taking an existing word already in common usage, and creating a new phrase using the letters in the word as the initial letters of the words in the phrase. For example, the United States Department of Justice assigns to their Amber Alert program the meaning "America's Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response,"[4] although the term originally referred to Amber Hagerman, a 9-year old abducted and murdered in Texas in 1996.

Examples
Backronyms can be constructed for educational purposes, for example to form mnemonics. An example of such a mnemonic is the Apgar score, used to assess the health of newborn children. The rating system was devised by and named after Virginia Apgar, but ten years after the initial publication, the backronym APGAR was coined in the US as a mnemonic learning aid: Appearance, Pulse, Grimace, Activity, and Respiration.[5]

Alcoholics Anonymous and other 12-step programs use backronyms as teaching tools, similar to slogans such as "one day at a time," or "Let go, let God," but often with an ironic edge. For example, a slip may be expanded as "Sobriety Losing Its Priority,"[6] and denial as "Don't Even Notice I Am Lying."[7]

Backronyms are often created as jokes, often expressing consumer loyalties or frustration. For example, the name of the restaurant chain Arby's is a play on "RB," referring to "roast beef" as well as the company's founders, the Raffel brothers. An advertising campaign in the 1980s created a backronym with the slogan "America’s Roast Beef, Yes Sir!"[8]

Many companies or products spawn multiple humorous backronyms, with positive connotations asserted by supporters or negatives ones by detractors. For example, Ford, the car company founded by Henry Ford, was said to stand for "First on Race Day" among aficionados[9] but disparaged as "Fix Or Repair Daily" and "Found On Road, Dead" by critics.[10]

False acronyms
Sometimes the backronym is so commonly heard, that it is widely but incorrectly believed to have been used in the formation of the word, and amounts to a folk etymology or an urban legend. Examples include posh, an adjective describing stylish items or members of the upper class. A popular story derives the word as an acronym from "Port Out, Starboard Home," referring to first class cabins shaded from the sun on outbound voyages east and homeward heading voyages west.[11] The word's actual etymology is unknown, but it may relate to Romani påš xåra "half-penny" or to Urdu safed-pōśh (one who wears 'white robes'), a derogatory term for wealthy people.[12]

Other examples include the brand name Adidas, named for company founder Adolf "Adi" Dassler but falsely believed to be an acronym for "All Day I Dream About Sports,"[13], wiki, said to mean "What I Know Is,"[14] but in fact derived from the Hawaiian phrase wiki wiki meaning "fast"[15], or Yahoo, incorrectly claimed to mean "Yet Another Hierarchical Officious Oracle," but in fact chosen because Yahoo's founders liked the meaning of the word itself.[16]

As lexicographer Jesse Sheidlower points out in his book The F-Word, acronyms were rare prior to the twentieth century, and most etymologies of common words or phrases that suggest origin from an acronym are false.[17]

References
^ a b McFedries, Paul. "bacronym". Word Spy: The World Lover's Guide to New Words. WordSpy.com. http://www.wordspy.com/words/bacronym.asp. Retrieved 2009-05-19.
^ "Acronym". Dictionary.com. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/acronym. Retrieved 2006-11-15.
^ NASA. "RADAR means: Radio Detection and Ranging". Nasa Explores. Archived from the original on 2007-10-14. http://web.archive.org/web/20071014061010/http://nasaexplores.com/show_k4_teacher_st.php?id=030703122033.
^ "AMBER Alert - America's Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response". Amberalert.gov. 2007-11-01. http://www.amberalert.gov/. Retrieved 2010-07-08.
^ "The Virginia Apgar Papers - Obstetric Anesthesia and a Scorecard for Newborns, 1949-1958". U.S. National Library of Medicine, NIH. http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/CP/Views/Exhibit/narrative/obstetric.html. Retrieved 2008-11-18.
^ Keep Coming Back: Humor and Wisdom for Living and Loving Recovery by Meiji Stewart Google Books Result. Hazelden Publishing. 1999. ISBN 9781568383781. http://books.google.com/books?id=gf4y3fdElKgC&pg=PA79&dq=%22Sobriety+losing+its+priority%22&ei=BAV0SIGOM4fKjgGntpTpBw&client=firefox-a&sig=ACfU3U2KMTloFo6yCCL2D3du4cSScFzF2w. Retrieved 2008-07-08.
^ Lord Wolf Designs. "Recovery Related Acronyms and Meanings for A.A. & N.A. use". 12-steps-recovery.com. http://12-steps-recovery.com/library/acronyms.html. Retrieved 2010-07-08.
^ Gross, Daniel (2009-11-07). "Too Much Beef: Why Arby's is so low on the restaurant food chain.". Slate.com. http://www.slate.com/id/2234863/. Retrieved 2010-07-08.
^ "Drag Racing's Internet Magazine". Competition Plus.com. http://www.competitionplus.com/2006_07/dick_brannan.html. Retrieved 2010-07-08.
^ ConsumerNet, Inc.. "Automotive Humor, Car Jokes". Carbuyingtips.com. http://www.carbuyingtips.com/humor.htm. Retrieved 2010-07-08.
^ Quinion, Michael (2005). Port Out, Starboard Home: And Other Language Myths. Penguin Books. ISBN 0-14-101223-4. ; published in the US as Quinion, Michael (2006). Ballyhoo, Buckaroo, and Spuds. HarperCollins. ISBN 0-06-085153-8.
^ "posh, adj. and n.". Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2009.
^ All Day I Dream About Sport: The Story of the Adidas Brand, ISBN 1904879128
^ "The wiki principle". Economist.com. http://www.economist.com/surveys/displaystory.cfm?story_id=6794228. Retrieved 2006-11-15.
^ "wiki - Definitions from Dictionary.com". http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/wiki. Retrieved 2006-11-15.
^ "The History of Yahoo! - How It All Started...". Yahoo.com. http://docs.yahoo.com/info/misc/history.html. Retrieved 2010-08-24.
^ Sheidlower, Jesse (2009). The F-Word. New York: Oxford University Press US. ISBN 0195393112.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backronym
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Fritz Kempf
Ere WikiMusketier


Geregistreerd op: 4-4-2006
Berichten: 10370
Woonplaats: Wipers (Ieper)

BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Aug 2010 12:38    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

CQD = Come Quick Distress
CQD = Come Quick Distater
_________________
"Kennscht mi noch?" ~~~ Who is the real "Fritz Kempf"?

Ypres Salient on Pictures
Discover the Salient - Meet the men


FHSW Wikia
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Bekijk de homepage MSN Messenger
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16253
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Aug 2010 12:45    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Snaaip @ 29 Aug 2010 13:38 schreef:
...Distater

Disaster?
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
maxmadmartin



Geregistreerd op: 27-11-2006
Berichten: 2229
Woonplaats: oostende

BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Aug 2010 13:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De uitleg is juist Smile
SOS werd gekozen omdat het een kort ,compact en moeilijk verwisselbaar signaal was..; punt aan de lijn Evil
éen ding werd in dit artikel echter over het hoofd gezien ( denk ik toch,correct me if i'am wrong, Surprised ).
Het gaat hier enkel over het audiosignaal,nergens over het visueel signaal... speechless
het sein was dus ook met lichtbakens gemakkelijk over te zetten... Very Happy
grzt,MMM daddaaa(no signal) Smile
_________________
People always have been the foolish victims of deception and self-deception in politics, and they always will be, until they have learned to seek out the interests of some class or other behind all moral, religious, political and social phrases, declarations and promises.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16253
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Jan 2011 22:57    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Noodkreet SOS ingevoerd op 22 november 1906
Reformatorisch Dagblad, 22-11-2010



SOS is de naam voor het internationale noodsignaal voor draadloze communicatie. In morsecode wordt het weergegeven als drie puntjes, drie streepjes, drie puntjes.

De voorloper van SOS was CQD (cq klinkt als het Franse sécu, het eerste deel van sécurité, gevolgd door de d van het Engelse disaster of distress). SOS heeft de interpretaties ”Save our ship” en ”Save our souls” meegekregen. De eerste SOS dateert van 1900 en werd opgevangen door de installatie aan boord van de Russische kruiser Afrika. Na de officiële invoering in 1906 werd het sein in 1909 ook door de Amerikanen overgenomen. 

http://www.refdag.nl/achtergrond/geschiedenis/noodkreet_sos_ingevoerd_op_22_november_1906_1_516974
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Algemeen Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group